NEWS WIND & WEATHER

Think Wind – Think Windsocks Australia – Think Weatherworks

WINDSOCK COLOURS

STANDARD COLOURS & DIMENSIONS WINDSOCKS OR WIND INDICATORS:  For Aviation Purposes White is used for the Primary Windsock and Yellow for Secondary Windsocks.  They are by regulation (CASA) 8 foot (2400mm) or 12 foot (3600mm) for larger airfields and airports as well as many pastoral airstrips. The accepted published dimensions are 3600mm in length with a Mouth of 900mm diameter and a Tail of 250mm. For smaller airstrips the 2400mm windsock is preferred and has a Mouth of 600mm diameter and a Tail of 235mm

WINDSOCK PASTORAL CROWN CATTLE HUGHENDEN QLD

WINDSOCK PASTORAL CROWN CATTLE HUGHENDEN QLD

SPECIAL PURPOSE WINDSOCK COLOURS & DIMENSIONS: Windsocks in this category range from 4 foot (1200mm) to 6 foot (1800mm) long and fall into the following colour categories:

 

YELLOW / NEON/FLOURESCENT YELLOW: Yellow is perhaps the most visible and is useful colour when viewing the wind indicator from the ground on a cloudy day against a sky full of white or grey clouds. The colour yellow is visually seen from the furthest distance away. Yellow windsocks are suitable for hazardous gas or chemical factories or storage facilities. The colour yellow is classed as an official BIO Hazard warning colour, especially concerning workplace safety such as environmental & personnel protection from toxic or hazardous gases, chemical leaks, fumes and airborne particulates

YELLOW 600MM WITH SS CUSTOM MADE WINDSOCK FRAME

WINDSOCK NEON YELLOW 600MM WITH SS CUSTOM MADE WINDSOCK FRAME

ORANGE / NEON / FLOURESCENT ORANGE WINDSOCKS: Orange (a very popular colour) windsocks are generally used on building or road construction sites for dust control, or additionally as a warning indicator for traffic safety. Use extensively also in the mining, oil and gas industries

WINDSOCK FRAMES 'CYCLONIC' PILBARA NITRATES SEPTEMBER 2016

WINDSOCK FRAMES ‘CYCLONIC’ PILBARA NITRATES SEPTEMBER 2016

 

RED WINDSOCKS: Red Windsocks are used as a warning colour on rifle ranges; at gun clubs; shooting events; mine sites; quarries; explosive detonation sites; explosives storage;  fireworks displays; explosive building demolishing or in fact, for any areas that maybe dangerous to the public, work place or work site personnel. Red windsocks are often selected by organisations for promotional purposes with contrasting White lettering which is a real standout

WINDSOCK RED WITH CONTRASTING WHITE LETTERING

  WINDSOCK RED WITH CONTRASTING WHITE LETTERING

PINK & MAGENTA WINDSOCKS: Pink or Magenta Windsocks are used in or near bushland, forests, vineyards, farms, wetlands or grasslands, due to other windsock colours possibly blending in with the surrounding natural backgrounds, or  fruit trees, vines or shrubs when in blossom. Also for use when aerial spraying. Having said that the demand for these two colours is practically non-existent

 

WHITE WINDSOCKS: White Windsocks are used for the primary wind indicator at airports, helipads or airfields. Additionally, white fabrics are natural in colour, and hence do not fade over a long period of time. Environmental factors such as engine exhausts, factory pollution, airfield or roadside dust will contribute to discolouration. A pristine example was produced for Microflite Melbourne

WINDSOCK WHITE WITH LOGO MICROFLITE MELBOURNE

WINDSOCK WHITE WITH LOGO MICROFLITE MELBOURNE

GREEN WINDSOCKS: Green windsocks are used by orchardists, viticulturists, or farmers when fruit trees, vines or shrubs are in blossom for pump spray pesticide drift monitoring

 

PURPLE WINDSOCKS: Purple Windsocks can be used where industry regulations permit or for use against light reflective building constructions, hence providing a visually solid windsock colour. Demand is very limited for purple windsocks

 

WINDSOCKS BANDED RED/WHITE; ORANGE/WHITE;YELLOW/BLACK & OTHER COLOUR COMBINATIONS

Banded windsocks are widely used throughout Europe and are increasing in popularity as well as being standard requirement along with Neon Orange for offshore oil & gas related vessels for helidecks as well as onshore helipads. The examples below were fabricated for the Australian Army Parachute Regiment

WINDSOCKS BANDED COLOUR COMBINATIONS

WINDSOCKS BANDED COLOUR COMBINATIONS

Footy windsocks are becoming popular with this Hawthorn example produced for an ardent Hawthorn supporter

WINDSOCKS FOOTY HAWTHORN SUPPORTER

   WINDSOCKS FOOTY HAWTHORN SUPPORTER

Banded windsocks with fluorescent night view strips either in Silver or Yellow are becoming more popular. Saves having to illuminate the windsock. Simply shine your torch or vehicle lights on the windsock and the wind direction is instantly shown

RED/WHITE WITH FLUORESCENT NIGHT VIEW STRIPS

WINDSOCK BANDED RED/WHITE WITH FLUORESCENT NIGHT VIEW STRIPS

 

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The Stevenson Screen: Meteorological Screen: Weather Box: Instrument Shelter

Standardising Temperature Recording

A Stevenson Screen is a white slatted ‘weather box’ on legs or on a stand which used to be found in almost every country in the world and has been in use since 1865.

Stevenson Screen Exterior|Alan Sim

Getting a number of scientists to agree on anything has always been a problem. Especially when it comes to data collection, and even more so when the data has to be collected from different latitudes and altitudes. The Stevenson Screen was designed to hold instruments for measuring temperature, humidity and air pressure, and to avoid irregularities in data collection. Few scientists dispute its effectiveness

STEVENSON SCREEN

STEVENSON SCREEN

Description of the Stevenson Screen

The screen is actually a box, made of a double layer of louvred screens at all four sides, with a solid top and base. The box is set on sturdy legs at a designated height, which is 1.25m in the UK, but 2m in many other places where the ground radiates a lot of heat. The whole structure is painted white to reflect the heat of the sun, and the doors open towards the north (south in the Southern Hemisphere). The screen is designed to allow free passage of air, while keeping out rain and snow, leaves and animals.

The Stevenson Screen is one of a very few designs that is recommended by the World Meteorological Organization for use in every region of the world, and Stevenson Screens are also erected for use in field studies on plants or animals where temperature is part of the data collected. This widely adopted data collection device was invented in 1864 by Thomas Stevenson.

Thomas Stevenson

Thomas Stevenson was an engineer from a family of lighthouse builders. Born in 1818, his father was Robert Stevenson who built lighthouses and evidently encouraged all three sons to carry on his practice of saving ships, cargos and lives by erecting beacons to mark dangerous rocks. From his work on lighthouses, harbours and rivers, Stevenson developed a healthy respect for storms and an abiding interest in weather. He was the father of Robert Louis Stevenson who, in an article titled Thomas Stevenson – Civil Engineer, wrote: “Storms were his sworn adversaries, and it was through the study of storms that he approached that of meteorology at large. Many who knew him not otherwise, knew – perhaps have in their gardens – his louvre-boarded screen for instruments.” His interest in Meteorology led to Thomas Stevenson being one of the founders of the Scottish Meteorological Society.

The Wide Usage of the Stevenson Screen

In the British Medical Journal of May 15, 1886 the Stevenson Screen is mentioned in connection with a case of pneumonia in a region so cold that the medicine froze in the room and had to be kept under the patient’s pillow. The author of the article, Dr Wise, mentions that the outside temperature was measured within a Stevenson Screen. The screen is used in conditions varying from Saharan to Arctic, with some adaptations of size and height. Data collected in the screens is now transmitted electronically in most cases but the overall design is still the same as when Thomas Stevenson devised it in 1864.

Sources

Stevenson, Robert Louis, Thomas Stevenson – Civil Engineer, Memories and Portraits, 1887

Wise, A, Tucker, A Case of Pneumonia, Occurring at a Cold High Altitude, The British Medical Journal, Vol. 1, No. 1324, May 15, 1886.

Stevenson Screen: Environment Canada,http://www.on.ec.gc.ca/skywatchers/ontario/wx_office_tour/compound/screen_e.html